Not logged in? Join one of the largest Debt Reduction Forums on the Internet! Join Now!   Latest blog post: The Worst Kinds of Debt

Advertisments:


Useful Links:

FTC Debt Reduction Advice
FTC Money Matters Website
National Foundation For Credit Counselling
Debt Reduction UK
MyMoney.Gov

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Credit Card Debt discussions & tips

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Postby niyol » Sun Apr 03, 2011 12:34 am

I am looking for the obituary of my aunt online for a research paper but it's from 2004 and I can't find a website that will allow me to look at the obituary or death record for free without having to give a credit-card number (I don't have a credit card!). What should I do? Any website suggestions?
Thanks!
niyol
 
Posts: 865
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 10:28 pm

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Postby walby93 » Sun Apr 03, 2011 12:45 am

Newspaper archives from the town she died...or your local library..it is very recent so you are unlikely to find it online and free ( except newspapers if available online) you would need to target search the newspaper online and see....I would be off to the library.................................… or ask older family members who may have well cut it out and kept it http://familytimeline.webs.com/recordsinyourownhome.htm
walby93
 
Posts: 833
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 3:17 pm

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Postby teiji » Sun Apr 03, 2011 12:48 am

Try Google News Archives http://www.google.com/archivesearch and if she died in a town near you, go to the public library and see if they have old newspapers on microfilm. You can also contact the newspaper in the town where she died and see what archives they may have available.

Here is a link to the Social Security Death Index (free) which will give you date of death and the town where she died.
http://ssdi.rootsweb.ancestry.com/
teiji
 
Posts: 887
Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2011 6:11 pm

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Postby ramzey36 » Sun Apr 03, 2011 12:58 am

See if you local library has subscription websites for Newspapers like Heritage Quest or NewsBank. Mine has NewsBank and I was able to register at the library to access the website at home for free.
ramzey36
 
Posts: 890
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 1:59 pm

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Postby mael » Sun Apr 03, 2011 1:00 am

See if you local library has subscription websites for Newspapers like Heritage Quest or NewsBank. Mine has NewsBank and I was able to register at the library to access the website at home for free.
You may not be able to find it on-line. You may have to go to the library and dig it up.

People ask that question about 8 times a week here. The resolved questions are full of links and tips.

You are rare and special, but your question isn't. Here is my copy and paste answer.

USA Answer:

When someone famous dies, there will be obituaries all over the Internet.

Looking for an ordinary person on the other hand, is searching for a needle in a haystack. It is like fly fishing, too; you have to cast a number of times and you still may not find anything.

It may be in
http://www.obitcentral.com/
http://www.legacy.com/NS/
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

The newspaper that ran it may have it in their archives. Usually they keep it for 7, 30 or 90 days, though.

If the person died in Preble County, Ohio, prior to 1950, the county library web site may have it. By extension, the county library site for the county in question should be one of the "pools" you cast into. So should the US Gen Web site for the county, the Ancestry query board for the county and the GenForum board for the county.

If you live in the county, you can sometimes find the obit in the microfilmed newspapers. Sometimes there wasn't one, especially if the person died in a drug deal or the family was poor and the newspaper charged for obits. Big city newspapers don't print obits for everyone because they'd run out of space.

If you don't live in the county, you can send the library a name, date, SASE and $5 and request a copy. They will either try for it or return your check.

http://www.tedpack.org/obit.html
has two ways you can sometimes find a volunteer willing to look it up for you, with links and etiquette.

Sometimes you can find the obit in Google with an exact search. Try all forms of the name, enclosing it in quotation marks:

"Tom Edison"
"Thomas Edison"
"Thomas A Edison"
"Thomas Alva Edison"

"Edison, Tom"
"Edison, Thomas"
"Edison, Thomas A"
"Edison, Thomas Alva"

The case isn't important, nor do you need the commas. You and I know that "Thomas Alva Edison" and "Edison, Thomas Alva" are the same person, but a computer doesn't. You do have to use quotes ("), not apostrophes ('). Add "Obituary" and other words as needed outside of the quotation marks if you get too many hits for the name alone.

"Tom Edison" obituary
"Edison, Tom" obituary
"Thomas Edison" obituary
etc.
mael
 
Posts: 860
Joined: Tue Mar 22, 2011 11:02 am

I need absolutely free death records/obituaries, no credit-card required?

Postby brett » Sun Apr 03, 2011 1:02 am

See if you local library has subscription websites for Newspapers like Heritage Quest or NewsBank. Mine has NewsBank and I was able to register at the library to access the website at home for free.
You may not be able to find it on-line. You may have to go to the library and dig it up.

People ask that question about 8 times a week here. The resolved questions are full of links and tips.

You are rare and special, but your question isn't. Here is my copy and paste answer.

USA Answer:

When someone famous dies, there will be obituaries all over the Internet.

Looking for an ordinary person on the other hand, is searching for a needle in a haystack. It is like fly fishing, too; you have to cast a number of times and you still may not find anything.

It may be in
http://www.obitcentral.com/
http://www.legacy.com/NS/
http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi

The newspaper that ran it may have it in their archives. Usually they keep it for 7, 30 or 90 days, though.

If the person died in Preble County, Ohio, prior to 1950, the county library web site may have it. By extension, the county library site for the county in question should be one of the "pools" you cast into. So should the US Gen Web site for the county, the Ancestry query board for the county and the GenForum board for the county.

If you live in the county, you can sometimes find the obit in the microfilmed newspapers. Sometimes there wasn't one, especially if the person died in a drug deal or the family was poor and the newspaper charged for obits. Big city newspapers don't print obits for everyone because they'd run out of space.

If you don't live in the county, you can send the library a name, date, SASE and $5 and request a copy. They will either try for it or return your check.

http://www.tedpack.org/obit.html
has two ways you can sometimes find a volunteer willing to look it up for you, with links and etiquette.

Sometimes you can find the obit in Google with an exact search. Try all forms of the name, enclosing it in quotation marks:

"Tom Edison"
"Thomas Edison"
"Thomas A Edison"
"Thomas Alva Edison"

"Edison, Tom"
"Edison, Thomas"
"Edison, Thomas A"
"Edison, Thomas Alva"

The case isn't important, nor do you need the commas. You and I know that "Thomas Alva Edison" and "Edison, Thomas Alva" are the same person, but a computer doesn't. You do have to use quotes ("), not apostrophes ('). Add "Obituary" and other words as needed outside of the quotation marks if you get too many hits for the name alone.

"Tom Edison" obituary
"Edison, Tom" obituary
"Thomas Edison" obituary
etc.
Another option you might be able to try if getting the info off the web or from the library isn't an option:

For obituaries:

If you know the name of the newspaper it ran in, you can call the newspaper and ask. They may request a payment to cover research costs and you can send them a check with a "formal" written request.

For death records:

Depending on the year, you can send a written request to the county or state with a check to cover the copy/research costs. Most counties have their requirements online to request a copy of a death certificate.
brett
 
Posts: 864
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 2:38 am


Return to Credit Card Debt

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post